The SEO Project

Link Out to Medium-Level Bloggers

Joshua HardwickJoshua Hardwick

It might sound like warped logic, but linking out to others can actually help you to build links.

This is especially true if you link out to medium-level (i.e. semi-famous) bloggers.

Why?

Because medium-level bloggers don’t yet have the level of fame that well-known “influencers” and top-level bloggers in your niche might have.

This means that getting mentioned (and linked to) is still a big deal for them.

But, with top-level bloggers, getting mentioned likely occurs every day of the week, so it’s less exciting for them…

simpsons-meme

It’s possible to take advantage of this fact by not only making an effort to link out to medium-level bloggers in the first place…

…but also following up with a well-crafted outreach campaign.

Here’s how to do it:

First, find industry blogs/bloggers with these Google search operators:

medium-blogger-operator

And…

medium-blogger-operator-2

I recommend using Simple SERP Scaper (free) to scrape the results directly into a spreadsheet.

The results should look something like this:

serp-scraper-results

Next, copy/paste all the URLs into a Domain Authority (DA) checker such as MozCheck.com:

mozcheck

This will return a number of metrics for the sites including Domain Authority (DA), Page Authority (PA) and MozRank:

mozcheck-results

Add these values to your spreadsheet alongside the list of URLs (just make sure they match up!):

Filter your spreadsheet by DA, then delete any URLs with a DA < 30 or >55.

You’ll now be left with medium DA’s – these are most likely run by medium-level bloggers.

Now, it’s a case of creating a new piece of content for your site and incorporating links to those bloggers within the content.

Note: Don’t force these links in, and most certainly don’t like to the homepage. Instead, look for high-quality, relevant resources on the bloggers website(s) and incorporate them into your content.

Publish your post, then reach out to all the bloggers you linked out to using this template:

“Hey [NAME],

I’m [YOUR NAME], [POSITION] at [WEBSITE].

Just wanted to give you a quick heads-up, as I recently linked out to your post about [INSERT TOPIC] in my latest blog post.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. Anything you’d add?

[YOUR NAME]”

The response rate should be relatively high (typically ~15% – it can vary, though) and hopefully, they should mostly be comprised of “thank you” messages.

For any bloggers who respond, visit their blog and look for broken links (use Broken Link Building or The Moving Man Method to do this).

If/when you find one, check out the broken link on Archive.org, then find a post on your site that would be a good replacement for the link – you could also create a custom piece of content if you don’t already have one.

Reply to the blogger with this template:

“Hey [NAME],

No problem!

Actually, I was just reading your post about [TOPIC] and noticed one of your links was broken.

It’s this one: [INSERT SCREENSHOT OF BROKEN LINK]

I actually published an improved version of this post a while back – might make a nice replacement?

Just a suggestion 🙂

[YOUR NAME]”

Note: The reason this works so well is because you did two things: added value to the blogger twice (by linking to them, then finding a broken link on their site); proposed a solution that made their site better.

You could also do this for low/top-tier bloggers too – it just tends to be less effective.

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