The SEO Project

Steal Links from Inferior Content

Joshua HardwickJoshua Hardwick

No matter what you write about, you can guarantee that there will be hundreds – if not thousands – of other blog posts about that topic.

For example, a simple Google search for “how to build links” returns 475 million results:

Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 09.46.59

Even a more obscure search like “best beaches in wales” returns in excess of 14 million results:

Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 09.47.38

Bottom line: you’re not the only one blogging about a particular topic.

But, if you’ve been investing in high-quality content on your site, your piece of content on [topic] will probably be better than most other posts out there.

Even so, it’s likely that some of those inferior blog posts will still have a bunch of links.

Because you’ve already got a superior piece of content, reaching out and stealing links from that piece of content should be relatively easy.

Here’s how to do it:

Unless you’ve got thousands of blog posts already published on your site, you should already have a relatively clear idea of which content is the best (hint: it’s probably the content you spent the most time and effort creating).

But, if you’re struggling to figure it out, plug your domain into Ahrefs Site Explorer:

ahrefs-site-explorer-your-domain

Then click “top content” under “pages” on the left-hand menu:

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It’ll then show you every page on your site in order of popularity (i.e. your “best” content).

Next, pick one of these posts and search for that topic in Google:

Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 09.55.30

This is how you find similar yet inferior content.

Copy the URLs of the first 10 search results (use Simple SERP Scraper to speed this up).

And paste them into Ahrefs Batch Analysis tool:

Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 09.58.32

This will tell you how many backlinks each of the links has in one fell swoop.

Download the backlinks for each of the sites.

Reach out to the linkers and let them know about your “superior” content.

“Hey [NAME],

I’m [YOUR NAME], [POSITION] at [WEBSITE].

I was just reading one of your posts and noticed you linked out to [INSERT RESOURCE].

Great post!

I actually just published an updated (and somewhat superior) version of that exact post; though you might want to take a look?

Here’s the link:

I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Best,

[YOUR NAME]”

If they like it, suggest that they may want to consider linking to your content instead of the inferior content.

Here’s another template:

“Hey [NAME],

I’m glad you liked the post!

Any chance you’d consider changing the link in your post to the new version? I think that would be much more useful for your visitors 🙂

Let me know.

[YOUR NAME]”

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